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Miami Marlins expected to pursue veteran manager

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Dan Jennings is likely headed back to the front office.

Dale Zanine-USA TODAY Sports

Dan Jennings is likely headed back to the front office. Although the Marlins do not have a desire to discuss the managerial situation publicly, according to Barry Jackson of The Miami Herald, the organization is expected to pursue a veteran manager once the season ends.

Jackson adds the Marlins are "operating under the belief there will be a new manager next season," and that Jennings hinted to Laurence Leavy (Marlins Man) he would not be managing again in 2016.

When the Marlins dismissed Mike Redmond and opted to have Jennings move from the front office into the dugout, the club still had an opportunity to compete. Miami has been plagued by injuries throughout 2015, and while Jennings cannot be blamed for the Marlins' struggles, he will likely have an opportunity to put a new team together in the coming offseason. Jennings' experience as manager might help him make notable personnel decisions in the future.

Neither Ozzie Guillen nor Larry Beinfest will be on the payroll at the end of the season and the Marlins now might have additional payroll flexibility. Some of that can be used towards a manager and since Miami is unlikely to pursue an inexperienced candidate, Mike Lowell and Jeff Conine no longer might be realistic options.

Ron Gardenhire, Dusty Baker, Bud Black, and Ron Roenicke all have experience and could be considered by the Marlins. Andy Barkett managed Double-A Jacksonville to a championship last season and might be an internal option to watch. Charlie Manuel, Jim Riggleman, and Tim Wallach could also be possible.

MLB.com's Joe Frisaro notes Riggleman, who is currently Cincinnati's third base coach, could be an ideal fit because the Marlins are seeking a "no-nonsense personality in the dugout."

Once they get healthy, the Marlins will likely have an opportunity to compete consistently. With a new face in the dugout, Miami might thrive heading into 2016.