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Jim Bowden: Miami Marlins need to give Giancarlo Stanton no-trade clause

The Miami Marlins are planning to offer Giancarlo Stanton an extensive contract this offseason. ESPN's Jim Bowden told the Miami Herald an eight year deal with a no-trade clause should be a starting point.

Eliot J. Schechter

The Miami Marlins want to extend Giancarlo Stanton. That much has been made clear. But what he will cost remains to be seen.

Heading into the offseason, the Marlins have made it a priority to begin discussing a long term contract with their star right fielder. ESPN's Jim Bowden told the Miami Herald on Sunday the Marlins should offer Stanton an eight-year, $240 million which would include a no-trade clause.

The Marlins’ current mindset is to offer a deal longer than four years to Giancarlo Stanton, but plans are still being formulated.

ESPN analyst and former Nationals GM Jim Bowden told me Miami should offer an eight-year, $240 million contract with a no-trade clause.

"That starts the ball rolling," Bowden said. "It’s pretty hard as a human being, with two years left [before free agency], to turn down $240 million to $300 million."

Bowden said Thursday’s facial injuries should be "a reminder to Stanton [of] the importance of security and the risks of waiting until free agency" after 2016. Stanton wants assurances from Jeffrey Loria that the team is committed to winning before even considering an offer.


Read more here: http://miamiherald.typepad.com/sports-buzz/2014/09/heat-players-planning-changes-dolphins-chatter-stantons-future-um-postscripts.html#storylink=cpy

Miami hasn't offered a contract larger than the $100+ million deal they offered to Jose Reyes a few seasons ago. Shortly after, Reyes was traded, which makes the value of the clause increase drastically. The Marlins are one of a select few organizations that do not issue no-trade clauses to current players or prospective free agents. The lack of security has and could continue to turn free agents away from playing in South Florida.

If the Marlins want to retain Stanton, he may have to become the first player to receive a no-trade clause. Before signing moving forward, Stanton wanted to see that the Marlins can bounce back and win consistently. To this point, though a small sample size, a young team has been able to do so.

When the Marlins begin speaking to Stanton, the lack of a no-trade clause could also affect the value of a theoretical contract. If there is no reassurance, Stanton may ask for a higher yearly salary, and such a request might be justified. He has posted 37 home runs and 105 RBIs while carrying a young offense for most of the season. 

Stanton does have a few years left before free agency, and that could be something that works in Miami's favor. Despite the notable numbers, Stanton may have a difficult time rejecting a reasonable offer.

Bowden said Thursday’s facial injuries should be "a reminder to Stanton [of] the importance of security and the risks of waiting until free agency" after 2016. Stanton wants assurances from Jeffrey Loria that the team is committed to winning before even considering an offer.


Read more here: http://miamiherald.typepad.com/sports-buzz/2014/09/heat-players-planning-changes-dolphins-chatter-stantons-future-um-postscripts.html#storylink=cpy

Stanton's injury and his ability to recover heading into the offseason should motivate the front office to get a deal done. The Marlins have also made it clear they will take Stanton into free agency without an extension, but Stanton has been connected to teams such as Los Angeles and Boston. 

Miami will look to improve the roster as soon as the season ends. And that begins with locking up one of the best players on their roster.